Water, sunlight and patience. 
“The intentional routine has always belonged to a single life. When I am single, I wake up on my own exactly at the time that I need to, and then I get coffee and read on the couch and get ready for work. […] My routines were very calculated and aspirational. But as soon as you’re in a couple, all that’s gone. At first your life together looks erratic. There’s the abandonment of routine. But routine is sort of what happens when you’re not paying attention.” Dayna Tortorici.

Water, sunlight and patience. 

The intentional routine has always belonged to a single life. When I am single, I wake up on my own exactly at the time that I need to, and then I get coffee and read on the couch and get ready for work. […] My routines were very calculated and aspirational. But as soon as you’re in a couple, all that’s gone. At first your life together looks erratic. There’s the abandonment of routine. But routine is sort of what happens when you’re not paying attention.” Dayna Tortorici.

Francesca Woodman knew some things about shapes, “a sophisticated understanding of form”. The dreamiest geometry.
 Zigzag is showing at the Victoria Miro gallery in Mayfair until 4th October.

Francesca Woodman knew some things about shapes, “a sophisticated understanding of form”. The dreamiest geometry.

Zigzag is showing at the Victoria Miro gallery in Mayfair until 4th October.

Reading List, Soho Edition.
“All I ever really want to know is how other people are making it through life. Where do they put their body, hour by hour, and how do they cope inside of it.” Miranda July.
   ***
The best time I (maybe) got rabies. Lola Pellegrino, The Hairpin
Mary HK Choi bought a very expensive coat. [NY Magazine]
"I had a strong sense of destiny in my youth. I don’t know what my parents thought of me moving to London when I was 22. I never thought about it and I didn’t go home to Akron, Ohio, for 35 Christmases.” [Chrissie Hynde in The Guardian]
Ellen Willis, and Nona Willis Aronowitz, on being a wife. And Jessica Cohen in MarieClaire on her “commuter marriage”.
"Is San Francisco Pacific Time? San Francisco is a good time. “ Molly Sanchez at The Bold Italic answers Google autofill questions about the City.
A song of spice and fire. Jazmine Hughes at The Hairpin marks the start of Pumpkin Spice Latte season.
"Why don’t you try being a dick and striking out on your own and making a fucking mess for a change?” Ask Polly is at NY Magazine now, still killing it. 
Sarah Nicole Prickett on BabeVibes. And, on men who invite you round to have you watch them do things.
What Stewart Scott-Curran learned about people from working in a call centre. [Medium]
Obituaries for the pre-dead. [Margalit Fox, The New York Times]
Kiera Feldman wrote a very clever piece about Tinder. [Playboy]
How to write a novel. [Emma Stroud, Rookie]
Sadie Stein’s cookbook addiction [The Paris Review]
Deer on the Golden Gate Bridge!

Reading List, Soho Edition.

“All I ever really want to know is how other people are making it through life. Where do they put their body, hour by hour, and how do they cope inside of it.” Miranda July.

  ***

The best time I (maybe) got rabies. Lola Pellegrino, The Hairpin

Mary HK Choi bought a very expensive coat. [NY Magazine]

"I had a strong sense of destiny in my youth. I don’t know what my parents thought of me moving to London when I was 22. I never thought about it and I didn’t go home to Akron, Ohio, for 35 Christmases.” [Chrissie Hynde in The Guardian]

Ellen Willis, and Nona Willis Aronowitz, on being a wife. And Jessica Cohen in MarieClaire on her “commuter marriage”.

"Is San Francisco Pacific Time? San Francisco is a good time. “ Molly Sanchez at The Bold Italic answers Google autofill questions about the City.

A song of spice and fire. Jazmine Hughes at The Hairpin marks the start of Pumpkin Spice Latte season.

"Why don’t you try being a dick and striking out on your own and making a fucking mess for a change?” Ask Polly is at NY Magazine now, still killing it. 

Sarah Nicole Prickett on BabeVibes. And, on men who invite you round to have you watch them do things.

What Stewart Scott-Curran learned about people from working in a call centre. [Medium]

Obituaries for the pre-dead. [Margalit Fox, The New York Times]

Kiera Feldman wrote a very clever piece about Tinder. [Playboy]

How to write a novel. [Emma Stroud, Rookie]

Sadie Stein’s cookbook addiction [The Paris Review]

Deer on the Golden Gate Bridge!

15 Sep 2014 / 2 notes / reading list 

Autumn. 


While summer is the Best Thing Ever, there’s something pretty magical about autumn. It’s still warm, but there’s an air of mania round, as people seem to take it just a little further. There’s a determined “last hurrah” going on, as we’re wringing out everything we can get before the world gets gets cold and wet and a bit shit. I always go full on for autumn too, determined to keep my momentum through to winter. This works really well, until December when it doesn’t anymore. Right now, though, it’s still warm enough to wear a summer coat at night, and it’s even warmer after all these mojitos. I’m in my thick tights and big jumpers, saying yes to every invitation and yes to another drink, even though this cocktail bar with its just-the-right-side-of-crude toilet art is way too pricey. The world is full on red, orange and yellow in a last fiery blast before winter, when everything dies and it feels like life will never come back. But for now it’s autumn, and there’s still a little summer left.  

Autumn.
While summer is the Best Thing Ever, there’s something pretty magical about autumn. It’s still warm, but there’s an air of mania round, as people seem to take it just a little further. There’s a determined “last hurrah” going on, as we’re wringing out everything we can get before the world gets gets cold and wet and a bit shit. I always go full on for autumn too, determined to keep my momentum through to winter. This works really well, until December when it doesn’t anymore. Right now, though, it’s still warm enough to wear a summer coat at night, and it’s even warmer after all these mojitos. I’m in my thick tights and big jumpers, saying yes to every invitation and yes to another drink, even though this cocktail bar with its just-the-right-side-of-crude toilet art is way too pricey. The world is full on red, orange and yellow in a last fiery blast before winter, when everything dies and it feels like life will never come back. But for now it’s autumn, and there’s still a little summer left.  

13 Sep 2014 / 1 note / autumn words 

We went to Norway. 

We went to Norway

9 Sep 2014 / 0 notes / norway travel 

Never enough.

2 Sep 2014 / 3 notes / KATE MOSS FOREVER 

Reading List, Mountain Pose edition.
“Right now, I’m lost in a transition. The old is dead, and I don’t know what the new is. The only way to find the new is to start different things and see if there’s something that can come out of experimentation. It’s somewhat unsettling, but it’s a hopeful thing in a way. I’ve been here before, lots of times.” David Lynch.
"At one point she was stuck on a lyric, and Lindsey Buckingham suggested, ‘Just write about sex.’”  Christine McVie.
[Marianne Faithfull photo by John Pratt]
   ***
Patricia Lockwood’s GrubStreet food diary. I won’t quote from this because it’s ALL GOLD.
I Promise to Be a Worse, More Prolific Writer. Elizabeth Spiers.
Without you I’m nothing. Alexandra Molotkow in The Believer, on the lovers of rockstars.
"Nostalgia for lost love is cowardice disguised as poetry.” Jeanette Winterson, The Guardian.
“They often view it as trivial, even though what I do is try to show the ways in which seemingly trivial things like celebrities and gossip actually communicate much larger ideas about society and ideology.” Anne Helen Petersen, interviewed by Flora Tsapovsky in Ravishly.
On hushed forgiveness. Tag Savage.
The joy of exercising in moderation. Samuel Sattin, The Atlantic.
How different cultures understand time. Richard Lewis, Business Insider.
On the scourge of relatability. Rebecca Mead, The New Yorker.
This place makes everyone a gambler. Alice Bolin in The Believer, on Los Angeles and Joan Didion.
"I just never formed the habit of living, the way most people do. They […] wake up and, without a second thought, without knowing they are deciding, decide to live. I am not one of these people. Every day I wake up and think why. I know I’ll decide to live like everyone else, but […] I remain the kind of addict who believes each time she reaches for air that it’s her choice.” Sarah Nicole Prickett.

Reading List, Mountain Pose edition.

“Right now, I’m lost in a transition. The old is dead, and I don’t know what the new is. The only way to find the new is to start different things and see if there’s something that can come out of experimentation. It’s somewhat unsettling, but it’s a hopeful thing in a way. I’ve been here before, lots of times.” David Lynch.

"At one point she was stuck on a lyric, and Lindsey Buckingham suggested, ‘Just write about sex.’”  Christine McVie.

[Marianne Faithfull photo by John Pratt]

  ***

Patricia Lockwood’s GrubStreet food diary. I won’t quote from this because it’s ALL GOLD.

I Promise to Be a Worse, More Prolific Writer. Elizabeth Spiers.

Without you I’m nothing. Alexandra Molotkow in The Believer, on the lovers of rockstars.

"Nostalgia for lost love is cowardice disguised as poetry.” Jeanette Winterson, The Guardian.

“They often view it as trivial, even though what I do is try to show the ways in which seemingly trivial things like celebrities and gossip actually communicate much larger ideas about society and ideology.” Anne Helen Petersen, interviewed by Flora Tsapovsky in Ravishly.

On hushed forgiveness. Tag Savage.

The joy of exercising in moderation. Samuel Sattin, The Atlantic.

How different cultures understand time. Richard Lewis, Business Insider.

On the scourge of relatability. Rebecca Mead, The New Yorker.

This place makes everyone a gambler. Alice Bolin in The Believer, on Los Angeles and Joan Didion.

"I just never formed the habit of living, the way most people do. They […] wake up and, without a second thought, without knowing they are deciding, decide to live. I am not one of these people. Every day I wake up and think why. I know I’ll decide to live like everyone else, but […] I remain the kind of addict who believes each time she reaches for air that it’s her choice.” Sarah Nicole Prickett.

Maybe even more so.

The astrologer at The Rumpus, Madame Clairevoyant, isn’t actually a real astrologer. If there’s even such a thing. But what she writes is beautiful, and although I know she made it up, that’s still the case. Maybe even more so.

Cancer: This week there will be so many ways to know your own self, there will be so many ways to anchor yourself in this world. You can wear clothes that look like the fire you feel in your heart, you can wear clothes that match all the greens and blues of your dreams; you can wear clothes that glitter like the stars. There are so many songs you can sing, there are so many spells you can cast, there are so many ways to remind yourself of the person you most want to be.

28 Aug 2014 / Reblogged from therumpus with 650 notes

Articles lately.
A travel article on Melbourne for Qatar Happening (p116-117). I made a point to reference Bundaberg ginger beer, the number one local custom I took home after my January trip <3
I interviewed Mark Howling, CEO of Pulsant, for Megabuyte. He does that thing too, where he bores easily at work but will have the same breakfast every day for years. Food-ruts for the win.
… More technology and internet trends for UK2, on TB100.com  / VPS.net / Midphase. Especially these:
* The disappearing internet * Why simpler is better for viral tech * Wearable tech is rubbish, but it’s still happening* The demise of Google Alerts and what it maybe means* How Big Data is changing science+ Some fave health apps 

Articles lately.

A travel article on Melbourne for Qatar Happening (p116-117). I made a point to reference Bundaberg ginger beer, the number one local custom I took home after my January trip <3

I interviewed Mark Howling, CEO of Pulsant, for Megabuyte. He does that thing too, where he bores easily at work but will have the same breakfast every day for years. Food-ruts for the win.

… More technology and internet trends for UK2, on TB100.com  / VPS.net / Midphase. Especially these:

The disappearing internet 
Why simpler is better for viral tech 
* Wearable tech is rubbish, but it’s still happening
* The demise of Google Alerts and what it maybe means
* How Big Data is changing science
+ Some fave health apps 

27 Aug 2014 / 0 notes / work journalism 

The Examined Life / Stephen Grosz, 2013. 
I picked this up again to read just one essay, but ended up re-reading the whole thing instead. The cover credits say it’s “captivating”, and it’s the perfect description. 

The Examined Life / Stephen Grosz, 2013. 

I picked this up again to read just one essay, but ended up re-reading the whole thing instead. The cover credits say it’s “captivating”, and it’s the perfect description.